Governments: Good Practice Recommendations

Good Practice for GovernmentsGood-Practice
Good practice for governments in implementing the FATF standards. Read here.

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Getting Aid to SyriaGetting_aid_to_Syria-page-001
An example of how banks and humanitarian agencies can work together to ensure aid reaches civilians in need of assistance in  compliance with UK, EU and US sanctions.

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Multi stakeholder dialogue to mitigate effects of derisking by banks
An example from the Netherlands on how a civil society organisation facilitated a meeting between Dutch authorities and banks to highlight the problems experienced by Dutch NPOs with regards to banking services to partners in high risk countries as well as countries facing sanctions. This has resulted in one of the banks wanting to develop a ‘dynamic intake tool’ – a mechanism to check on the reliability of small, unknown NPOs that do not appear on regular client screening lists. Read more here.

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Report by the UN Special Rapporteur Maina Kiai on the rights to freedom of peaceful assembly and of association. Paras 35 and 36 deal specifically with the FATF.

“… FATF argues … that countries review the adequacy of laws and regulations that relate to entities than can be abused for the financing of terrorism. This call has been followed by a wave of new restrictions worldwide on funding for civil society. Many of these restrictions, unfortunately, do nothing to legitimately advance the fight against money-laundering and terrorism. Multilaterals-report-ENG-page-001Rather, the battle against crime and terrorism has been used by some States as a cover for imposing politically motivated restrictions on civil society funding. The Special Rapporteur thus remains concerned about the risk of over-regulation that FATF recommendations introduce. FATF and other regulatory regimes also have an impact on the business-friendliness of countries, and blurred lines may be interpreted bluntly to comply and protect the economy, to the detriment of the right of associations to operate freely….The Special Rapporteur views FATF and other similar regulations as posing a serious, disproportionate and unfair threat to those who have no connection with terrorism, including civil society organizations.”

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